Brazil culture

The European settlers also brought ideas, innovations and belief systems with them, shaping the local societies significantly. All of these different influences have meant that the modern-day Brazilian culture is unique and very complex.

Brazil culture

In Portuguese, Brasil; its citizens are Brasileiros or Brasileiras depending on gender. A year later, Italian navigator Amerigo Vespucci sailed to Brazil on a voyage commissioned by the Portuguese crown and returned home with a cargo of hard, reddish wood.

The wood was similar to an East Indian variety called pau brasil, which was then popular in Europe for making cabinets and violin bows.

Pau brasil brazilwoodthe first product to be exploited by the Portuguese in this new territory, is the origin of the country's name, Brazil. Because of its size and diversity, Brazil is one of the nations most deserving of the name "land of contrasts.

These divisions are used for administrative purposes such as the national Brazilian census and they roughly correspond to geographic, demographic, economic, and cultural variation within this sprawling nation.

The Northeast has the greatest proportion of people of African descent, the South and Southeast are home to the bulk of Brazilians of European and Japanese ancestry, while indigenous peoples live largely in the North and Central-West. Still, regional migration and extensive miscegenation racial inter-breeding has made Brazil one of the most racially diverse nations on earth.

Aside from the official fivefold regional division of Brazil, a simpler economic distinction is made between the poor, underdeveloped North and the wealthier, more industrialized South. This distinction is sometimes referred to as the "two Brazils" or "Belindia," with the wealthy South being compared to Belgium and the poor North to India.

Urban, middle-class Brazilians are generally unfamiliar with the interior of their own country and misrepresent it as a region of unrelenting poverty and backwardness—a stark place of few creature comforts that is best avoided.

Brazil culture

One consequence of this attitude is that middle-class and wealthy Brazilians are more likely to have visited Miami, Orlando, or New York than to have traveled to tourist destinations in their own country.

One is a nordestino northeasterner or a mineiro native of the state of Minas Gerais or a carioca native of the city of Rio de Janeiro. Nevertheless, Brazilians share a national culture—making Brazil a true case of unity in diversity.

The legacy of the Portuguese in language, religion, and law serves to unify this vast land and its people. Until the mid-twentieth century almost all Brazilians were— at least nominally—Catholic and today, virtually all speak Portuguese and identify with the dominant Brazilian culture.

Brazil, the world's fifth largest country in geographical expanse and the Brazil largest nation in Latin America, comprises slightly under half the land mass of the South American continent and shares a border with every South American country except Chile and Ecuador.

Online shopping from a great selection at Books Store. Brazil has the greatest collection of flowers in the world. The world's third producer of hydroelectric power. Brazil is the fifth largest country in the world. The culture of Brazil is primarily Western, but presents a very diverse nature showing that an ethnic and cultural mixing occurred in the colonial period involving mostly Indigenous peoples of the coastal and most accessible riverine areas, Portuguese people and .

It is the size of the continental United States excluding Alaska. Brazil's physical environment and climate vary greatly from the tropical North to the temperate South.

The landscape is dominated by a central highland region known as the Planalto Central Brazilian Highlands, or Plateau of Brazil and by the vast AmazonBasin which occupies overone-third of the country. The central plateau juts into theseaina few areas along Brazil's 4,mile-long, 7,kilometer-long coast, but it more often runs parallel to the ocean, creating a fertile, lowland area.

Brazil is a land rich in natural resources, principally iron ore, bauxite, manganese, nickel, uranium, gold, gemstones, oil, and timber. The physical environment in each region determined the types of crops grown or the resources extracted and this, in turn, influenced the populations that settled there and the social and economic systems that developed.

Brazil's economic history, in fact, has been marked by a succession of cycles, each one based on the exploitation of a single export commodity:The Brazilian culture is one of the world's most varied. Things to do in Rio during Carnival like the Samba parade and Masquerade Carnival balls.

Brazilian Culture and Lifestyle Guide What You Should Know About Living and Traveling in Brazil. Brazilian culture is diverse and fascinating.

To fully appreciate all that Brazil has to offer it is important to understand the unique qualities of it's land and people. The Brazilian culture is one of the world’s most varied and diverse.

This is due to its being a melting pot of nationalities, as a result of centuries of European domination as well as slavery, which brought hordes of African migrants across Brazil’s borders to live in and influence the local cultures with their ancient customs and benjaminpohle.com: Amelia Meyer.

People usually think of Brazil as a tropical paradise, whose people are dancing and having fun all day long. Rio's Carnival has helped to develope that image. However, only Rio de Janeiro and the Northeast apply to that prototype.

What You Should Know About Living and Traveling in Brazil

Brazilian culture is much more than that. Brazilian people are a. Brazil - Cultural life: The cultures of the indigenous Indians, Africans, and Portuguese have together formed the modern Brazilian way of life. The Portuguese culture is by far the dominant of these influences; from it Brazilians acquired their language, their main religion, and most of their customs.

The Indian population is now statistically small, but . Brazil is the only Portuguese-speaking nation in the Americas, making the language an important part of Brazilian national identity and giving it a national culture distinct from those of its Spanish-speaking neighbors.

Brazil: Culture - TripAdvisor